Vegetable Oils Cause Cancer, Disease, Body Fat & Inflammation

Fat is essential to your survival and health. But you need to know which ones are safe to include in your diet. Let's start with vegetable oils. Just because they have "vegetable" in it does not mean...

I’m going to get right to the point today, stop eating vegetable and “seed” oils such as:

Soybean oil.
Canola oil.
Corn oil.
Cottonseed oil.
Sunflower oil.
Peanut oil.
Sesame oil.
Rice bran oil.

These polyunsaturated oils cause multiple health problems, diseases, an increase in body fat, diabetes, cancer, and inflammation.

Even though they aren’t really vegetables, these oils are commonly referred to as “vegetable oils.” These oils contain very large amounts of biologically active fats called Omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are harmful in excess.

Vegetable Oils

However, this does NOT apply to healthy plant oils like olive oil or coconut oil, which are extremely good for you.

Fake Fats

Industrial seed oils like corn, cottonseed, safflower, soybean, and sunflower are not foods we should look to increase in our diets. These are fake, man-made fats.

These oils were never a significant contributor to the human diet until the past 50 years and this is because they’re cheap.

cheap oils

Remember, these plants are not potent fat sources, especially corn. To concentrate the oil and make it usable, it has to be exposed to high heat, degummed, refined, bleached, deodorized, and other nasty stuff to produce a cheap, clear oil with a long shelf life.

These oils are now devoid of the healthy polyphenols that provide antioxidant protection for the easily oxidized polyunsaturated fats.

Imbalance Between Omega 6 & Omega 3 Fats

There are two types of fatty acids that are termed “essential” – because the body can’t produce them.

These are the Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids.

It is absolutely essential for the human body to get these fatty acids from the diet, but it must get them in a certain balance.

While humans were evolving, our Omega-6: Omega-3 ratio may have been around 3:1 to 1:2. Almost similar amounts of each.

Omega-3

Today, our ratio is as high as 20:1 on average, with even higher ratios towards Omega 6’s with those who eat more processed/packaged foods – as well as eating out most of your meals.1

The higher Omega 6 fat ratio is known to cause type 2 diabetes, heart disease, inflammation, arthritis, depression, weight gain, and even cancer.2-8

Vegetable Oils Are High In “Trans Fats”

In addition to the omega 6 ratio problems, vegetable oils are high in “trans fats”.

These fats are highly toxic and are associated with an increased risk of various diseases, like heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and obesity.6-8

Trans Fats

And these trans fats are found in the vegetable oils you see on the shelves, which have a very LONG and unnatural shelf-life. They are ALSO found in most baked goods because they’re cheap and extend the shelf-life of these packaged products.

Bad For Heart Disease & Cholesterol Levels

Polyunsaturated fats are promoted to help lower the “bad” LDL cholesterol (lipoprotein), however … they ALSO decrease the more important, beneficial “good” HDL cholesterol (lipoprotein) as well and to a great extent — so, what’s the point?!!

Trans Fats & Heart Disease

This imbalance is another reason these vegetable oils increase your risk for heart disease, heart attacks, and strokes.9-11

Eat More Healthy Fats

You need to have fat in your diet, it’s essential to your survival and health. Just stay away from these unhealthy, fake fats and read all the labels for these hidden fats.

I suggest that a minimum of at least 20% of your calories come from healthy fats such as extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, avocados, macadamia nut oil, nuts such as walnuts, whole eggs, fatty fish such a wild-caught salmon, and flaxseeds.

    1. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0753332206002435
    2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16841861
    3. http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/83/6/S1483.abstract
    4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19022225
    5. http://www.docsopinion.com/2013/05/03/inflammation-and-heart-disease/
    6. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199008163230703
    7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9322581
    8. http://jn.nutrition.org/content/135/3/562.short
    9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2166702/
    10. http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=662108
    11. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-1-4684-0967-3_18